The Nature Conservancy in TN @tn_nature

Conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Help us protect Tennessee nature today:

The Nature Conservancy in TN photos and videos

2 hours ago

Happy #FirstDayofFall

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Yesterday

Thanks to @hootsfromthehill for recently hosting some future conservationists for a successful bat building session at another great “Batty for Bats” event! 🦇

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4 days ago

On this #WildlifeWednesday we feature a deer--with formidable antlers--doing some nighttime browsing at our Chestnut Mountain Preserve. At the peak of development, a deer's antlers can grow a quarter of an inch per day! Made of bone and live tissue, antlers serve as tools for working out differences among males, and attracting females, during the mating season. Each year, a buck will eventually lose his antlers before regenerating more in anticipation of the next mating season.

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2 weeks ago

Make sure to include the moon in your plans tonight. According to the Farmers’ Almanac, today’s moon will be the first full moon visible across the U.S. on Friday the 13th since Oct. 13, 2000. The next one isn’t expected to happen again for another 30 years – on Aug. 13, 2049.

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2 weeks ago

On this #WildlifeWednesday we're featuring a coyote who seemed to enjoy time in the spotlight provided by one of our Chestnut Mountain nature cams. Coyotes are common in Tennessee, occurring in a diversity of habitats around the state. They boast keen eyesight and a well developed sense of smell that is more than 23 times better than humans. They use these tools for hunting and detecting the presence of other coyotes and wildlife. A coyote may run up to 30 mph for short distances. They are good swimmers, but poor climbers.

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3 weeks ago

A big shout-out goes out to our staff and partners from Tennessee Valley Authority, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for cutting, welding, moving steel, digging and everything else that was necessary for installing a cave gate in Stewart County.

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3 weeks ago

Elusive and nocturnal, bobcats are rarely spotted by humans, unless you have a wildlife camera like those we have posted at the Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain. Although bobcats are seldom seen, they roam throughout much of North America. North American populations are believed to be quite large, with perhaps as many as one million cats in the United States alone. #WildlifeWednesday

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3 weeks ago

Can we just take a quick moment to recognize all of the pollinators out there doing some SERIOUS labor? Without them, we would be without so many of our favorite things - chocolate, coffee, apples, blueberries and avocados (to name a few ). #laborday [Photo Credit: @carmenaer ]

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4 weeks ago

Thanks to support from the Barbara J. Mapp Foundation, we have installed wildlife cameras around our Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain to capture nature in "real time." One of these cameras recently captured an adult turkey vulture feeding its young. Vultures do not carry prey back to their chicks. Instead, they gorge at a carcass and regurgitate the food from their crop. #WildlifeWednesday

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last month

The future is bright! @tntechuniversity student Dallas Johnson visited our Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain with his biology professor, Dr. Shawn Krosnick, to kick off his senior thesis. Dallas will be inventorying vegetation at a wetland site located at the Reserve during fall and spring. We look forward to learning more.

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last month

Go get 'em today, even if you are "winging it" on this #WildlifeWednesday

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last month

Happy #NationalRelaxationDay ! Today would be a good time to give forest bathing a try. In Japan, the practice of forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku, means taking in the forest through all of our senses. This is not exercise. It is simply being in nature, connecting with it through sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch. Shinrin-yoku is like a bridge. By opening our senses, it bridges the gap between us and the natural world.

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last month

Images from our new trail cameras confirm that abundant wildlife calls our Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain “home-sweet-home,” like this curious squirrel that risks falling prey to one of these Eastern Timber rattlesnakes!

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last month

Exciting news! A TWRA biologist recently documented a Green Salamander at the Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain. [Photo Credit @ Daniel Istvanko]

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last month

The Nature Conservancy is excited to welcome several scientists to our Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain this summer to inventory plants and animals located on the property. For instance, Dr. Stephen Stedman has been visiting weekly to collect information about butterflies. Check out his list so far: - Silver-spotted Skipper - Hoary Edge - Southern Cloudywing - Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - Spicebush Swallowtail - Clouded Sulphur - Cloudless Sulphur - Little Yellow - Eastern Tailed-Blue - Variegated Fritillary - Great Spangled Fritillary - Red-spotted Purple - Pearl Crescent - American Lady - Common Buckeye - Appalachian Brown

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July 2019

The Southeast Conservation Corps was recently back to work at the Bridgestone Reserve at Chestnut Mountain putting up road and boundary signs, and developing a trail to a waterfall!

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July 2019

It's #NationalMothWeek and according to ThoughtCo, there's a lot to learn and to celebrate! 1. Moths outnumber butterflies by a 9-to-1 ratio. 2. Most moths are nocturnal, but many fly during the day. 3. Moths come in all sizes. 4. Male moths have a remarkable sense of smell. 5. Many moths are important pollinators. 6. Some moths do not have mouths. 7. Not all moths eat, but they are often eaten. 8. Moths use all kinds of tricks to avoid being eaten. 9. Some moths migrate. 10. Moths are attracted to light bulbs, bananas and beer. Learn more at: www.thoughtco.com/fascinating-facts-about-moths.

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July 2019

Thanks to support from #LWCF , The Nature Conservancy and @theconservationfund recently acquired, and transferred, approximately 553 acres to the U.S. Forest Service to become part of Cherokee National Forest. The three parcels included in this transaction were former inholdings within the national forest and play a key role in protecting the headwaters of Dry Fork, a tributary of the French Broad River. The transaction advances a collaborative effort by the partners to acquire and protect properties located within the national forest. [Photo Credit: French Broad River and Hairy Vetch © Creative Commons/dmott9]

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July 2019

Recently, seven members of our staff gathered in Nashville to participate in "Engaging Across Differences" training with colleagues from California, Hawaii, Arizona, Wisconsin, Connecticut, Brazil and Canada. EAD is an engaging and interactive workshop that TNC adapted from CARE, the international poverty alleviation organization. It acknowledges the critical role that differences, diversity and inclusion play in advancing TNC's conservation goals and reflects our organization's commitment to diversity.

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July 2019

TNC's latest conservation deal, where environmental stewardship meets economic opportunity, is truly conservation for all. It’s not about special interests. It’s about everyone’s interests. Imagine a World Cup soccer field covered in forest. Now imagine a span of 50 of these fields. Now imagine 50 spans of 50 forest fields. Now imagine 50 clusters of 50 spans of 50 forest fields. Add 11,000 more fields for good measure. Welcome to the Cumberland Forest Project. Visit nature.org/cumberland to learn more.

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July 2019

Recently we had the honor of working with friends from the Sierra Club, the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Great Schools Partnership and Conservation Fisheries, Inc. to hold a Nature Explorers Camp that introduced students from Lonsdale Elementary School in Knoxville to a whole new underwater world. We are convinced that we have three new scientists in the making!

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July 2019

Oh beautiful for spacious skies... Happy #FourthOfJuly ! [Photo © Brian E. Small]

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June 2019

One of our Tennessee trustees, Carolyn Long, and husband Jack (a TNC Texas trustee ) recently provided some free advertising during a bike ride near Beersheba Springs. We appreciate the love! [Photo Credit © Adam Long]

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June 2019

While kick starting breeding bird surveys at the Chestnut Mountain shortleaf pine restoration sites, our forest conservation director, Trish Johnson, and retired TTU professor Dr. Stephen Steadman came across mountain mint--a fragrant plant that is beneficial for butterflies, moths and other insects. These surveys will tell us which species of birds are utilizing diverse habitats that have been created by thinning out the forest and implementing prescribed burns. #goodfire

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June 2019

They say that "many hands make light work," which was the case, recently, when a youth team from the #SoutheastConservationCorps helped out at our Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain. We are grateful for the hard work and enthusiasm!

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June 2019

Happy first day of summer! May your days be filled with searching for snails, skipping rocks and other outdoor adventures.

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June 2019

Stumped on what to give Dad fir Father’s Day? Yew will be re-leafed to know that we’ve rounded up our favorite nature-themed dad jokes. For example: “For a fungi to grow, you must give it as mushroom as possible.” 😂 #HappyFathersDay

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June 2019

Most of us want to help save the ocean. This #WorldOceansDay , let's address the 200-ton blue whale in the room: how will we pay for it? 🐳

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June 2019

The results are in! Eighteen TNC operating units participated in the 2019 TNC Birding Challenge. Tennessee came in at a respectable 10 out of 18. Not bad for our first year playing the game! The coveted Golden Binoculars were awarded to our colleagues in TEXAS for greatest overall species total and to VIRGINIA for the greatest number of species from a single preserve (Virginia Coastal Reserve ). We had a great time participating and look forward to next year!

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June 2019

Thanks to funding from @nfwf we are mapping the Cumberland Plateau's eco-zones in order to prioritize future prescribed burning activities in the region. With assistance from @natureserveorg botanists, we documented the presence of rose pogonia orchid, which is rare in Tennessee, as part of this successful two-day effort. #goodfire

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May 2019

We've been busy at Chestnut Mountain, laying out remote wildlife monitoring tools, including 30 cameras that will be installed to capture photos, video and time-lapse imagery.

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May 2019

Our Director of Forest Conservation, Trish Johnson, recently hosted some Tennessee Tech University botany students at Chestnut Mountain. The class will spend Fridays in June collecting data on vegetation and wetlands located in two 25-acre stands of shortleaf pine located on the property. The work kick starts future efforts by the students to learn more about Chestnut Mountain's biodiversity. We can't wait to hear about what they learn! #scienceinaction

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May 2019

Today we recognize, with gratitude, men and women who served their country in order to make the world a better place. Warm wishes to you and your family on #MemorialDay

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May 2019

Like rolling stones that gather no moss, our state director, Terry Cook and TNC forester, Stuart Hale, spent a long day driving the roads at the new Ataya property. It's time to get to work! #natureawaits

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